6 Questions to Ask Generative AI Vendors You’re Evaluating

6 Questions to Ask Generative AI Vendors You’re Evaluating

With all the power exhibited by today’s large language models, many businesses are scrambling to leverage them in their offerings. Enterprises in a wide variety of domains – from contact centers to teams focused on writing custom software – are adding AI-backed functionality to make their users more productive and the customer experience better.

But, in the rush to avoid being the only organization not using the hot new technology, it’s easy to overlook certain basic sanity checks you must perform when choosing a vendor. Today, we’re going to fix that. This piece will focus on several of the broad categories of questions you should be asking potential generative AI providers as you evaluate all your options.

This knowledge will give you the best chance of finding a vendor that meets your requirements, will help you with integration, and will ultimately allow you to better serve your customers.

These are the Questions you Should ask Your Generative AI Vendor

Training large language models is difficult. Besides the fact that it requires an incredible amount of computing power, there are also hundreds of tiny little engineering optimizations that need to be made along the way. This is part of the reason why all the different language model vendors are different from one another.

Some have a longer context window, others write better code but struggle with subtle language-based tasks, etc. All of this needs to be factored into your final decision because it will impact how well your vendor performs for your particular use case.

In the sections that follow, we’ll walk you through some of the questions you should raise with each vendor. Most of these questions are designed to help you get a handle on how easy a given offering will be to use in your situation, and what integrating it will look like.

1. What Sort of Customer Service Do You Offer?

We’re contact center and customer support people, so we understand better than anyone how important it is to make sure users know what our product is, what it can do, and how we can help them if they run into issues.

As you speak with different generative AI vendors, you’ll want to probe them about their own customer support, and what steps they’ll take to help you utilize their platform effectively.

For this, just start with the basics by figuring out the availability of their support teams – what hours they operate in, whether they can accommodate teams working in multiple time zones, and whether there is an option for 24/7 support if a critical problem arises.

Then, you can begin drilling into specifics. One thing you’ll want to know about is the channels their support team operates through. They might set up a private Slack channel with you so you can access their engineers directly, for example, or they might prefer to work through email, a ticketing system, or a chat interface. When you’re discussing this topic, try to find out whether you’ll have a dedicated account manager to work with.

You’ll also want some context on the issue resolution process. If you have a lingering problem that’s not being resolved, how do you go about escalating it, and what’s the team’s response time for issues in general?

Finally, it’s important that the vendors have some kind of feedback mechanism. Just as you no doubt have a way for clients to let you know if they’re dissatisfied with an agent or a process, the vendor you choose should offer a way for you to let them know how they’re doing so they can improve. This not only tells you they care about getting better, it also indicates that they have a way of figuring out how to do so.

2. Does Your Team Offer Help with Setting up the Platform?

A related subject is the extent to which a given generative AI vendor will help you set up their platform in your environment. A good way to begin is by asking what kinds of training materials and resources they offer.

Many vendors are promoting their platforms by putting out a ton of educational content, all of which your internal engineers can use to get up to speed on what those platforms can do and how they function.

This is the kind of thing that is easy to overlook, but you should pay careful attention to it. Choosing a generative AI vendor that has excellent documentation, plenty of worked-out examples, etc. could end up saving you a tremendous amount of time, energy, and money down the line.

Then, you can get clarity on whether the vendor has a dedicated team devoted to helping customers like you get set up. These roles are usually found under titles like “solutions architect”, so be sure to ask whether you’ll be assigned such a person and the extent to which you can expect their help. Some platforms will go to the moon and back to make sure you have everything you need, while others will simply advise you if you get stuck somewhere.

Which path makes the most sense depends on your circumstances. If you have a lot of engineers you may not need more than a little advice here and there, but if you don’t, you’ll likely need more handholding (but will probably also have to pay extra for that). Keep all this in mind as you’re deciding.

3. What Kinds of Integrations Do You Support?

Now, it’s time to get into more technical details about the integrations they support. When you buy a subscription to a generative AI vendor, you are effectively buying a set of capabilities. But those capabilities are much more valuable if you know they’ll plug in seamlessly with your existing software, and they’re even more valuable if you know they’ll plug into software you plan on building later on. You’ve probably been working on a roadmap, and now’s the time to get it out.

It’s worth checking to see whether the vendor can support many different kinds of language models. This involves a nuance in what the word “vendor” means, so let’s unpack it a little bit. Some generative AI vendors are offering you a model, so they’re probably not going to support another company’s model.

OpenAI and Anthropic are examples of model vendors, so if you work with them you’re buying their model and will not be able to easily incorporate someone else’s model.

Other vendors, by contrast, are offering you a service, and in many cases that service could theoretically by powered by many different models.

Quiq’s Conversational CX Platform, for example, supports OpenAI’s GPT models, and we have plans to expand the scope of our integrations to encompass even more models in the future.

Another thing you’re going to want to check on is whether the vendor makes it easy to integrate vector databases into your workflow. Vectors are data structures that are remarkably good at capturing subtle relationships in large datasets; they’re becoming an ever-more-important part of machine learning, as evinced by the fact that there are now a multitude of different vector databases on offer.

The chances are pretty good that you’ll eventually want to leverage a vector database to store or search over customer interactions, and you’ll want a vendor that makes this easy.

Finally, see if the vendor has any case studies you can look at. Quiq has published a case study on how our language services were utilized by LOOP, a car insurance company, to make a far superior customer-service chatbot. The result was that customers were able to get much more personalization in their answers and were able to resolve their problems fully half of the time, without help. This led to a corresponding 55% reduction in tickets, and a customer satisfaction rating of 75% (!) when interacting with the Quiq-powered AI assistant.

See if the vendors you’re looking at have anything similar you can examine. This is especially helpful if the case studies are focused on companies that are similar to yours.

4. How Does Prompt Engineering and Fine-Tuning Work for Your Model?

For many tasks, large language models work perfectly fine on their own, without much special effort. But there are two methods you should know about to really get the most out of them: prompt engineering and fine-tuning.

As you know, prompts are the basic method for interacting with language models. You’ll give a model a prompt like “What is generative AI?”, and it’ll generate a response. Well, it turns out that models are really sensitive to the wording and structure of prompts, and prompt engineers are those who explore the best way to craft prompts to get useful output from a model.

It’s worth asking potential vendors about this because they handle prompts differently. Quiq’s AI Studio encourages atomic prompting, where a single prompt has a clear purpose and intended completion, and we support running prompts in parallel and sequentially. You can’t assume everyone will do this, however, so be sure to check.

Then, there’s fine-tuning, which refers to training a model on a bespoke dataset such that its output is heavily geared towards the patterns found in that dataset. It’s becoming more common to fine-tune a foundational model for specific use cases, especially when those use cases involve a lot of specialized vocabulary such as is found in medicine or law.

Setting up a fine-tuning pipeline can be cumbersome or relatively straightforward depending on the vendor, so see what each vendor offers in this regard. It’s also worth asking whether they offer technical support for this aspect of working with the models.

5. Can Your Models Support Reasoning and Acting?

One of the current frontiers in generative AI is building more robust, “agentic” models that can execute strings of tasks on their way to completing a broader goal. This goes by a few different names, but one that has been popping up in the research literature is “ReAct”, which stands for “reasoning and acting”.

You can get ReAct functionality out of existing language models through chain-of-thought prompting, or by using systems like AutoGPT; to help you concretize this a bit, let’s walk through how ReAct works in Quiq.

With Quiq’s AI Studio, a conversational data model is used to classify and store both custom and standard data elements, and these data elements can be set within and across “user turns”. A single user turn is the time between when a user offers an input to the time at which the AI responds and waits for the next user input.

Our AI can set and reason about the state of the data model, applying rules to take the next best action. Common actions include things like fetching data, running another prompt, delivering a message, or offering to escalate to a human.

Though these efforts are still early, this is absolutely the direction the field is taking. If you want to be prepared for what’s coming without the need to overhaul your generative AI stack later on, ask about how different vendors support ReAct.

6. What’s your Pricing Structure Like?

Finally, you’ll need to talk to vendors about how their prices work, including any available details on licensing types, subscriptions, and costs associated with the integration, use, and maintenance of their solution.

To take one example, Quiq’s licensing is based on usage. We establish a usage pool wherein our customers pre-pay Quiq for a 12-month contract; then, as the customer uses our software money is deducted from that pool. We also have an annual AI Assistant Maintenance fee along with a one-time implementation fee.

Vendors can vary considerably in how their prices work, so if you don’t want to overpay then make sure you have a clear understanding of their approach.

Picking the Right Generative AI Vendor

Language models and related technologies are taking the world by storm, transforming many industries, including customer service and contact center management.

Making use of these systems means choosing a good vendor, and that requires you to understand each vendor’s model, how those models integrate with other tools, and what you’re ultimately going to end up paying.

If you want to see how Quiq stacks up and what we can do for you, schedule a demo with us today!

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